... having trouble working these out, lil help, please?:)  TOPIC_SOLVED

Quadratic equations and inequalities, variation equations, function notation, systems of equations, etc.

... having trouble working these out, lil help, please?:)

Postby Paracelsus on Fri Jan 27, 2012 1:25 am

1/3 - (x+1)/5 = x/3 (only there are no parenthesis around the x+1 over 5... if that matters in this instance) ... and

(y+5)/12 = 3/4 - (y+1)/8 (once again, no parenthesis around the fractions with variables in these equations...)


My issue is figuring out whether if what I currently have is an acceptable answer or if there's actually a way to simplify
it further... everything else i'm currently working on i feel pretty comfortable with. It just seems to be these two that
frustrate me... any help is appreciated greatly:)
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Postby stapel_eliz on Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:23 pm

Paracelsus wrote:1/3 - (x+1)/5 = x/3

(y+5)/12 = 3/4 - (y+1)/8

Your formatting, using the grouping symbols, is correct for text-based formatting for fractions. In LaTeX formatting, the equations would be:

. . . . .

. . . . .

Paracelsus wrote:My issue is figuring out whether if what I currently have is an acceptable answer or if there's actually a way to simplify it further...

What were the instructions? What did you start with? Are you really supposed to "simplify" instead of "solve"?

Thank you! :wink:
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Re: ... having trouble working these out, lil help, please?:

Postby Paracelsus on Fri Jan 27, 2012 2:54 pm

... oh, solve. but i just wanted to make sure my work was accurate. finding a common denominator and then, one friend suggested, getting rid of the denominator and solving the problem as 5 - 3x + 3 = 5x, and 2y + 10 = 18 - 3y +3.

thank again for your help, btw:)
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  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby stapel_eliz on Sat Jan 28, 2012 4:23 am

You don't have to bother with getting common denominators. Just multiply through by whatever the common denominator would have been, had you converted.

By the way, you'll want to be careful with the grouping, so you don't drop signs. For instance, multiplying through the first equation by 15 will give you 5(1) - 3(x + 1) = 5(x), and this does not multiply out to what you've listed. :wink:
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