Algebra 1 help? please!?  TOPIC_SOLVED

Quadratic equations and inequalities, variation equations, function notation, systems of equations, etc.

Algebra 1 help? please!?

Postby ISuckAtAlgebra on Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:20 pm

Explain how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents follows from extending the properties of integer exponents to those values, allowing for a notation for radicals in terms of rational exponents. For example, we define 51/3 to be the cube root of 5 because we want (51/3)3 = 5(1/3)3 to hold, so (51/3)3 must equal 5.

Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents.

Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.

Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
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Re: Algebra 1 help? please!?  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby maggiemagnet on Tue Nov 01, 2011 3:01 pm

It's been a while since you posted this, but in case you're still pondering:

ISuckAtAlgebra wrote:Explain how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents follows from extending the properties of integer exponents to those values, allowing for a notation for radicals in terms of rational exponents. For example, we define 51/3 to be the cube root of 5 because we want (51/3)3 = 5(1/3)3 to hold, so (51/3)3 must equal 5.

What "properties of integer exponents" have you been given?

ISuckAtAlgebra wrote:Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents.

Look in your book or somewhere, find some expressions involving radicals, etc, and do the re-writing.

ISuckAtAlgebra wrote:Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.

For the first "explain", use two generic rationals, A = p/q and B = s/t. Then do the addition and multiplication, and show that the results are also rational. For the second "explain", think about what it would mean if the sum of rational A and irrational B were rational C. What then would have to be true of B = C - A? For the third "explain", do the same sort of thing with multiplication as you just did with addition.

ISuckAtAlgebra wrote:Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

I'm not sure what they're meaning here. :confused: :oops:
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