Going Crazy over this Mean Value Theorem Question!!!  TOPIC_SOLVED

Limits, differentiation, related rates, integration, trig integrals, etc.

Re: Going Crazy over this Mean Value Theorem Question!!!

Postby kittie21 on Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:42 pm

I have read over both of my math texts many times, I am just really having difficulty with this concept. I understand the theory behind it, that if a function satisfies the two conditions then the slope of the tangent = f'(c) for some c on the interval of the function (a,b), but having a hard time apply the theorem.

so what I am up to now is that y-x/2sqrt c < y-x/2sqrt x

So just as long as x is larger than 0 and c is larger than x it should work for any numbers?
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Re: Going Crazy over this Mean Value Theorem Question!!!  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby Martingale on Sat Jan 29, 2011 6:06 pm

kittie21 wrote:I have read over both of my math texts many times, I am just really having difficulty with this concept. I understand the theory behind it, that if a function satisfies the two conditions then the slope of the tangent = f'(c) for some c on the interval of the function (a,b), but having a hard time apply the theorem.

so what I am up to now is that y-x/2sqrt c < y-x/2sqrt x

So just as long as x is larger than 0 and c is larger than x it should work for any numbers?

and y>x


yes
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Re: Going Crazy over this Mean Value Theorem Question!!!

Postby kittie21 on Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:17 pm

Thank you for your help! So glad I finally understand it.
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Re: Going Crazy over this Mean Value Theorem Question!!!

Postby Martingale on Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:50 pm

kittie21 wrote:Thank you for your help! So glad I finally understand it.



I'm not convinced that you do. Make sure you talk to your instructor about this problem.
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