Is y=(2x+5)(3x-7) considered factored form of a quadratic?  TOPIC_SOLVED

Quadratic equations and inequalities, variation equations, function notation, systems of equations, etc.

Is y=(2x+5)(3x-7) considered factored form of a quadratic?

Postby alan on Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:34 am

Factored form is stated as y=a(x-s)(x-t) so y=(2x+5)(3x-7) should be written as y=6(x+5/2)(x-7/3) to be in “proper” factored form.

I'm trying to determine if y=(2x+5)(3x-7) would be considered to be in factored form.

There may not be a definitive answer to this so feel free to offer your opinion.

If anyone knows of a credible site that has a definitive answer that would be great.

Thanks
alan
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2013 11:28 pm

Sponsor

Sponsor
 

Re: Is y=(2x+5)(3x-7) considered factored form of a quadrati  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby jg.allinsymbols on Fri Jan 04, 2013 4:44 am

It's a function y, of the independent variable, x. The function is in factored form. If you have that y=0,
then the resulting quadratic equation is 0=(2x+5)(3x-7), obviously still in factored form. This may be overly picky.
jg.allinsymbols
 
Posts: 71
Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2012 2:42 am


Return to Intermediate Algebra