Algebra 1 help? please!?

Quadratic equations and inequalities, variation equations, function notation, systems of equations, etc.
ISuckAtAlgebra
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Algebra 1 help? please!?

Postby ISuckAtAlgebra » Thu Oct 06, 2011 6:20 pm

Explain how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents follows from extending the properties of integer exponents to those values, allowing for a notation for radicals in terms of rational exponents. For example, we define 51/3 to be the cube root of 5 because we want (51/3)3 = 5(1/3)3 to hold, so (51/3)3 must equal 5.

Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents.

Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.

Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

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maggiemagnet
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Re: Algebra 1 help? please!?

Postby maggiemagnet » Tue Nov 01, 2011 3:01 pm

It's been a while since you posted this, but in case you're still pondering:
Explain how the definition of the meaning of rational exponents follows from extending the properties of integer exponents to those values, allowing for a notation for radicals in terms of rational exponents. For example, we define 51/3 to be the cube root of 5 because we want (51/3)3 = 5(1/3)3 to hold, so (51/3)3 must equal 5.
What "properties of integer exponents" have you been given?
Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents.
Look in your book or somewhere, find some expressions involving radicals, etc, and do the re-writing.
Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.
For the first "explain", use two generic rationals, A = p/q and B = s/t. Then do the addition and multiplication, and show that the results are also rational. For the second "explain", think about what it would mean if the sum of rational A and irrational B were rational C. What then would have to be true of B = C - A? For the third "explain", do the same sort of thing with multiplication as you just did with addition.
Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.
I'm not sure what they're meaning here. :confused: :oops:


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