Graphing Problem: given y = f(x), draw y = 3f(-x)  TOPIC_SOLVED

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Graphing Problem: given y = f(x), draw y = 3f(-x)

Postby Notamathperson on Sat Aug 28, 2010 6:12 pm

I am having trouble recalling what to do if a graph is multiplied. For example, y=f(x). Draw the graph of y=3f(-x). I am not sure how to start it.
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Postby stapel_eliz on Sat Aug 28, 2010 7:24 pm

Notamathperson wrote:I am having trouble recalling what to do if a graph is multiplied.

In general, if the function is multiplied by a number with , then the graph gets "taller" or "skinnier"; otherwise, it gets "shorter" or fatter. When is negative, the graph flips upside-down. :wink:
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Re: Graphing Problem: given y = f(x), draw y = 3f(-x)

Postby Notamathperson on Mon Aug 30, 2010 5:20 pm

The problem is, the graph of the function is given in coordinates. For example, (0,1), (1,1), (2,1), (3, .5), (4,0). That is f(x). I am not sure what how to find the coordinates when the function is 3f(-x).
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  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby stapel_eliz on Mon Aug 30, 2010 6:43 pm

Follow the instructions and examples provided in the lesson: To graph f(-x), find the corresponding point for f(x); then multiply the y-value by 3, and plot the point for that x-value. For instance, if they'd given you f(5) = 6, then f(-5) would be found by multiplying 6 by 3. :wink:
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