express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p  TOPIC_SOLVED

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express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby rach81381 on Wed Mar 02, 2011 5:51 pm

I have tried everything I can think of and can not figure this out to save my life. Please help me I am desperate.

An average Great Dane weighs between 120 and 150 pounds. Express the range of weight for a Great Dane in kilograms. Use the formula k=0.45p. I know the answer is 264.6 and 330.75kg but I just can't seem to figure out how to get there.
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby maggiemagnet on Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:10 pm

rach81381 wrote:An average Great Dane weighs between 120 and 150 pounds. Express the range of weight for a Great Dane in kilograms. Use the formula k=0.45p. I know the answer is 264.6 and 330.75kg but I just can't seem to figure out how to get there.

If "k" stands for "kilograms", "p" stands for "pounds", and "k=0.45p" is a formula for converting from "pounds" into "kilograms", then do the inequality with pounds, like the exercise gives you. You can use some variable like "w" (for "weight") or "GD" (for "Great Dane") between the two numbers.

Then use the formula they give you to convert the two numbers from "pounds" to "kilograms". :thumb:
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby rach81381 on Wed Mar 02, 2011 8:00 pm

I guess I just get it. I don't understand how to get to the answer. I keep coming up with 54
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby maggiemagnet on Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:32 pm

rach81381 wrote:I guess I just get it. I don't understand how to get to the answer. I keep coming up with 54

Okay, well, why don't we start with what you did when you tried to follow the step-by-step instructions I gave you. What was your compound inequality? What did you get when you plugged the two different numbers into the conversion formula? Since you started with three parts of a compound inequality and converted the two numbers at either end, how did you end up with just a number (that is, no inequality, no variable, and no other number)?

I'll be glad to try to find any errors, but I'll need to see what you're doing first. Thanks! :thumb:
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby rach81381 on Fri Mar 04, 2011 7:10 pm

What I keep doing is multiplying .45 by 120 . I can't figure out how to get to the correct answer
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby maggiemagnet on Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:44 pm

rach81381 wrote:What I keep doing is multiplying .45 by 120 . I can't figure out how to get to the correct answer

Okay; that should convert one of the numbers to what you need.

To complete the exercise, try following the step-by-step instructions, provided earlier. If you have trouble, please reply showing your work, starting with the compound inequality you made up. Thanks! :thumb:

(By the way, the answer you "know" is right, is wrong, at least according to what is in the exercise.)
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p

Postby rach81381 on Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:09 pm

The formula that I keep using is k=.45p I input 120lbs for the p and just mulitply .45*120=54 I have looked in the back of the book, it shows the answers, and it still says the answer for 120lbs is 264.6kg and for the 150lbs it is 330.75kg
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Re: express weight range in kilograms, using k=0.45p  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby maggiemagnet on Mon Mar 07, 2011 6:14 pm

When you multiply by a number that is less than "1", you have to get something that is smaller, so the larger numbers in the back of the book have to be wrong, given what you've provided. And you can confirm your values by using any of the many converters available online.

You might want to check with your instructor. It could be that s/he is aware of a typo or other error. But you're getting the right values, given the information you've provided. The answers in the back of the book are almost a fit if the dog's weight had been given in terms of kilograms, and you'd been asked to convert to pounds, but even that isn't a perfect fit. :thumb:
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