Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

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Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

Postby Nar on Sun Jan 05, 2014 1:40 am

Show that is symmetrical about .
Use for symmetry about

I know that I need to substitute and in and show they are the same but I'm not sure how to start and how to simplify

Thanks!
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Re: Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

Postby buddy on Sun Jan 05, 2014 6:30 pm

Nar wrote:Show that is symmetrical about .

I know that I need to substitute and in and show they are the same but I'm not sure how to start

Start by doing the substituting and use 1/sine instead of cosecant. Remember that sin(x + pi) = -sin(x) because of how the sine wave works.
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Re: Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

Postby Nar on Sun Jan 05, 2014 10:57 pm

Not sure how that works with the /2 in there. So would I have



But I can't use there with it all being /2 can I?
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Re: Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

Postby maggiemagnet on Mon Jan 06, 2014 2:42 am

Do x/2 = @ (theta) and use the formula they show at the link.
:clap:
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Re: Trig Symmetry: show y = 2csc(x/2)-2 symm. abt x = pi

Postby Nar on Mon Jan 06, 2014 10:31 am

Sorry, but I'm not sure what you mean by
maggiemagnet wrote:Do x/2 = @ (theta) and use the formula they show at the link.


I'm really struggling with this and yet it seems like it is simple but I'm really missing the point I think.
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Postby stapel_eliz on Mon Jan 06, 2014 1:15 pm

Nar wrote:Sorry, but I'm not sure what you mean by
maggiemagnet wrote:Do x/2 = @ (theta) and use the formula they show at the link.

I'm really struggling with this and yet it seems like it is simple but I'm really missing the point I think.

What are you getting when you use the indicated substitution?
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