Two Trigonometry Questions!  TOPIC_SOLVED

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Two Trigonometry Questions!

Postby smilelots1998 on Mon Nov 29, 2010 6:17 pm

From a window on the second floor of here house, a student measured the angles of elevation and depression of the top and base of the nearby tree. The student knows that the measurements were taken from a point c = 17.5 ft above the ground. How tall is the tree to the nearest foot if angle a = 27 and angle b = 38?


*How do I convert angle 27 and 38 into feet to find the height of the tree?

Find the measure of JK to the nearest tenth of a cm if angle A = 31 degrees, angle B = 24 degrees and h = 5.0.
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  TOPIC_SOLVED

Postby stapel_eliz on Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:59 pm

smilelots1998 wrote:From a window on the second floor of here house, a student measured the angles of elevation and depression of the top and base of the nearby tree. The student knows that the measurements were taken from a point c = 17.5 ft above the ground. How tall is the tree to the nearest foot if angle a = 27 and angle b = 38?

Draw the horizontal line-of-sight. Draw the slanty lines up to the top and down to the base. Label the angles with the given values. Label the portion of the height below the horizontal with the given length.

Using the lower triangle, solve for the distance from the tree. Then use this value to find the height of the upper triangle. Add this height to the rest of the height (being the height from the ground up to his window) to get the height of the tree.

smilelots1998 wrote:Find the measure of JK to the nearest tenth of a cm if angle A = 31 degrees, angle B = 24 degrees and h = 5.0.

How do J, K, h, A, and B relate? (We can't see the picture you're looking at.)

When you reply, please include a clear listing of your steps and reasoning so far. Thank you! :wink:
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